Protect Your Network From Your Employees

If your IT company is acting like all threats to your data and to your business’s computers are external, they’re missing the largest threat. Most intrusions into computer networks are made by, or made possible by, employees.

If your IT company isn’t taking steps to protect your network from your employees, while of course in no way blocking or slowing their work, you’ve got the wrong IT company. Not only should your IT company be preventing intrusion via email, regularly finding and removing viruses, and implementing one or more levels of firewall between the Internet and your internal network, but your IT company should also be locking your employees’ computers.

What is locking a computer?

Employees use the same software again and again. They might use as few as four programs. This makes it possible for your IT company to lock their computers to those programs, and a few other known and trusted applications. If your employee inadvertently or deliberately loads in a hostile program, one that might, for example, encrypt your server, snoop out and copy away your information, or log the passwords used by all employees, your IT company should have software resident on that employee’s computer that will prevent this unknown software from running. This is locking a computer.

No one measure can protect your network completely. If your IT company is telling you that they have one piece of software that does the complete job, they’re wrong. Your IT company should be speaking in terms of increasing security, measures that you can take that are almost invisible to your staff but individually give you good protection against intrusion and data theft. Together these measures make it very unlikely that ransomware, data theft, and password logging will succeed.

Call or email us. We understand network security. We’ll send a professional to your office to tell you how secure you are, and more importantly, what vulnerabilities you need to have fixed.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s